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The False Gods Who Enslave Us

In Genesis 3:5, the serpent tempts Eve to eat the forbidden fruit by telling her, “[Y]our eyes will be opened, and you will be like God.”           

That should ring a bell for us. Plenty of people today apparently believe they are gods.           

From China to Russia to Canada to the United States, elites have assumed godlike powers over the rest of us, claiming to know what is best for humanity and instituting laws and regulations designed to impose that knowledge. Allied with them are cabals of the world’s wealthiest individuals, who feed their vast resources into causes like climate change and population control, convinced they possess the wisdom to make a heaven on earth as long as the rest of us keep our mouths shut and do as we’re told.           

The Ancient Greeks and Romans may have sported a battalion of gods and demi-gods, but our celestial tycoons, our omniscient politicians, and our divinely inspired celebrities make up a boundless pantheon of supreme beings who believe they can control the world’s climate, wipe out a virus, and create wealth by printing money.           

The construction worker sitting at the tiny kitchen table in his trailer knows he must budget his salary to survive, but the deities sitting in Washington D.C. laugh at his prudence and throw his taxes to the wind.

The bank teller who believes she can tell the difference between a man and a woman is mocked by the gods of the ivory tower for her ignorance.

These same postmodern gods sneer at the doctors opposed to late-term abortions, cancel podcasters who oppose their narrative, and laugh at the “yokels” who can see through their deceptions.           

Meanwhile, another set of gods, invisible but as real as clay and iron, are standing by in the wings of our modern-day drama, and they will eventually make an appearance on stage. These are Rudyard Kipling’s “The Gods of the Copybook Headings.” They are the gods of consequences.

In Kipling’s poem, copybook headings refer to the maxims that once appeared at the top of the pages of notebooks used by school children over a century ago in Great Britain. The young would transcribe these proverbs to practice their penmanship while simultaneously absorbing ancient truths.           

The truths they copied never grow old. In Kipling’s poem, these include such adages as “Stick to the Devil you know,” “The Wages of Sin is death,” and “If you don’t work you die.”           

Opposed to these truths are the gods of the Market Place. In our current circumstances, these would include Big Pharma and Big Tech, bureaucrats like Dr. Fauci, plutocrats like Bill Gates, and all the rest of our power-hungry elites. For the moment, they appear to have the people by the throat, but sooner or later the Gods of the Copybook Headings will make their appearance:

Then the Gods of the Market tumbled, and their smooth-tongued wizards withdrew
And the hearts of the meanest were humbled and began to believe it was true
That All is not Gold that Glitters, and Two and Two make Four
And the Gods of the Copybook Headings limped up to explain it once more.


These gods, I suspect, are limping toward us right now, and I’m afraid they’re going to deliver their message good and hard. We’re about to suffer for the mistakes and deceits of our “smooth-tongued wizards” who believe they are gods.           

But here’s the good news. The Gods of the Copybook Headings come bearing the gift of truth and reality, and that truth will set us free from the arrogance and lies of the false gods seeking to make us slaves.

Flickr-Petri Damstén, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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